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Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) Symptoms

Signs of oppositional defiant disorder in children are usually apparent before the age eight. Behaviors may occur most with people the child knows well, such as family members or care providers. These behaviors are frequent, not age appropriate, and cause significant issues at school, at home, and/or with peers.

  • Losing one’s temper often.
  • Frequent arguing with adults or refusing to comply with adults’ rules or requests.
  • Often getting angry or being resentful or vindictive.
  • Deliberately annoying others; easily becoming annoyed with others.
  • Often blaming other people for one’s own mistakes or misbehavi

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Trust Issues

As an adult, traumatic life events such as an accident, illness, theft of or damage to personal property, or loss of a loved one may lead to issues with trusting others and feeling safe and secure. Being physically violated or attacked, as in the case of rape or assault, is likely to dramatically impact a person’s trust in the goodness of others. Veterans of military combat may also experience difficulty trusting others following the stresses of wartime violence. And within a committed relationship, being cheated on, or left for another will often lead to the development of trust issues.

Post traumatic Stress, which results from a person’s exposure to severe danger or perceived danger, can lead a previously healthy person to experience tremendous difficulty with trust. People may experience and re-experience the trauma in their minds, along with the associated anxiety, and often go to great lengths to create a feeling of safety, sometimes isolating themselves from others or becoming overly dependent.

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Recognizing Responsibility Assumption

Means that an individual has substantial or total responsibility for the events and circumstances that befall them in their personal life, to a considerably greater degree than is normally thought. Strong adherents of responsibility assumption consider that whatever situation they find themselves in, their own past desires and choices must have led to that outcome.

The term “responsibility assumption” has a specialized meaning beyond the general concept of taking responsibility for something, and is not to be confused with the general notion of making an assumption that a concept such as “responsibility” exists. In particular the general use of the term “responsibility” in everyday life and the legal field in particular is about assigning or apportioning blame for an event; responsibility assumption suggests a greater ability to affect the future.

 

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Memorial Day

LEST NOT FORGET!
Remember today why we celebrate Memorial Day, Lest not forget those who gave their lives for their country and our freedoms.

Remember those who have fought in the war on terrorism and came back with mental health issues like depression, stress and PTSD.

Remember our fore fathers who started our great nation and the sacrifices the men and women made leading up to and after the Revolutionary war.

Remember the soldiers who invaded Normandy and Utah beach in 1944 and lost their lives not knowing the outcome of the war.

LEST NOT FORGET!

3 Things Contributing to Your Depression

depression

There are a number of factors that can worsen your depression. Practicing mindfulness helps you to pay attention to and take responsibility for the things that you do or don’t do to exacerbate your depression. By knowing what some of these factors are, you will be able to monitor them and work towards minimizing their effects on your well-being.

Here are 3 of those factors:

  1. Stress.  High levels of stress tend to increase a hormone produced by the body known as Cortisol. Cortisol maintains the body in a “fight or flight” state which can become taxing on the mind and body. Additionally, cortisol promotes the increase of fat cells in the body, particularly around the stomach. Ways to reduce your stress level include: deep breathing, meditation, recreational activities, or simply reducing your stress load at work by saying “no.”
  2. Sleep.  Too much or too little sleep can aggravate depression. Maintaining a consistent sleep schedule is the key to enhancing the quality and quantity of your sleep. Developing a good sleeping habit will ensure that you wake up well rested, your brain will function adequately, and you will feel energized throughout the day. Try going to sleep and waking up around the same time every day.
  3. Food.  Certain foods you eat are associated with depression. Foods high in sugars or simple carbohydrates can spike your glucose level, slow down your metabolism, and aggravate your mood. Also, alcohol and too much caffeine can boost blood sugar levels, and make you more irritable. Reduce your intake of these foods and choose healthier options instead. Foods that have complex carbohydrates instead of simple carbohydrates allow your metabolism to speed up and work harder, giving you more energy and leaves you in a better mood. Incorporate more fresh fruits and vegetables that are high in nutrients, and reduce your intake of processed foods that you can find in cans, bags, or boxes.

What other factors could be contributing to your depression?

 

Read the full article: http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/10/02/6-things-that-can-worsen-depression/#at_pco=smlwn-1.0&at_si=53604f6c206debdf&at_ab=per-4&at_pos=0&at_tot=1

Learn more from a counselor by visiting our website today: http://www.affordablecounselingbrandon.com

Saying Sorry

What is it about the words “I’m sorry” that makes it so hard to say? Is is about the guilt behind the wrongdoing, or is it the ego behind always being right?

sorry

Whatever it is, people find it hard to apologize. Authentic and effective apology is the very core of healing, clarifying, and restoring relationships. Like forgiveness, an apology can cut the cycle of anger, revenge, and hatred. The person giving the apology can tend to feel extremely vulnerable, fearing how the apology will be received. The giver’s apology could be rejected, causing him or her to feel unforgivable, and therefore less likely to say sorry in the future. However, if the giver works internally on becoming proud of his or her own efforts in apologizing, then he or she can move from feeling unforgivable to being unforgiven. Being unforgiven is out of his or her control and does not diminish a person’s self-worth.

There are a number of things to consider when giving an apology. An effective apology shows that:

  • the giver recognizes that his or her actions were wrong or harmful
  • the giver takes full responsibility and is not defensive
  • the giver feels remorse for the wrongdoing
  • the giver wants to make amends
  • and the giver reassures that he or she will behave differently in the future

When giving an apology, the giver should not:

  • use ifs or buts; for example, “I apologize if I offended you,” or “I’m sorry but you shouldn’t take it personally.”
  • assume how the receiver feels
  • be unclear; avoid this by starting your apology with “I”
  • wait too long to apologize
  • apologize via text message, email, Facebook, or Twitter; do it in person

An apology can move mountains. A half-hearted one can make things worse. A sincere and well-crafted apology can restore relationships.

 

To read the entire article: http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/saying-youre-sorry-part-i-apologies-that-heal-0401144

Visit our website for more information about counseling: http://www.affordablecounselingbrandon.com

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The Chicken or the Egg?

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The age old question that still seems to baffle everyone. Well, which came first?

When it comes to eating and mental health, do mental health issues influence what people eat, or does what you eat affect your mental health? Rif El-Mallakh, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, states that although there is a correlation it remains unclear how diet relates to mental health.

A theory is that certain foods, or their absence, may contribute to poor mental health. For example, studies in people and in rats have linked zinc deficiency to depression. As shown in animal and human studies, poor diet can even impair memory and attention within a week. Gut bacteria might actually be a middleman in this theory, and studies have shown that changing diet can change human gut bacteria. However, changing one’s diet and gut bacteria does not cure mental illness. We are not at a point to be able to use diet as therapy, because we just don’t know enough yet. A full package of care, including medical and mental health care, is encouraged as it is an evidenced based method to battling mental illness.

Think your diet may be influencing your mental health? Don’t hesitate!

Visit our website now to find out how we can help: http://www.affordablecounselingbrandon.com 

To read more visit: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/can-what-you-eat-affect-your-mental-health-new-research-links-diet-and-the-mind/2014/03/24/c6b40876-abc0-11e3-af5f-4c56b834c4bf_story.html 

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